Rachel’s Challenge Delivers Anti-Bullying Message to Students

  • jellyfish Students at McIntosh High School had the opportunity to attend Rachel’s Challenge, a national anti-bullying program, based on the story of Rachel Joy Scott, the first victim of the Columbine High School shooting.

    During her short lifetime, Rachel kept several diaries and essays, each keeping to a similar theme that she would change the world. Her family and friends operate Rachel’s Challenge, traveling the world spreading her story to students and adults alike.

    Rachel’s uncle, Larry Scott, who also had two teenage children at Columbine High the day of the shooting, was at McIntosh on October 19 to share her story during two 60-minute presentations. Through her words and stories, students learned how bullying and harassment can easily turn into tragedy, but how simple acts of kindness and compassion can save lives and promote safe, and productive learning environments for everyone.

    Rachel’s tragic story, along with how she lead her life with hope, desire and purpose, brought both students and faculty members to tears. As Larry Scott talked about Rachel, he challenged students to show compassion, learn from their mistakes, and forgive themselves and others. He also challenged students to examine their own lives in light of personal challenges, and to dream big and start a chain reaction of kindness and compassion.

     

    Students at McIntosh High School had the opportunity to attend Rachel’s Challenge, a national anti-bullying program, based on the story of Rachel Joy Scott, the first victim of the Columbine High School shooting.penguins

    During her short lifetime, Rachel kept several diaries and essays, each keeping to a similar theme that she would change the world. Her family and friends operate Rachel’s Challenge, traveling the world spreading her story to students and adults alike.

    Rachel’s uncle, Larry Scott, who also had two teenage children at Columbine High the day of the shooting, was at McIntosh on October 19 to share her story during two 60-minute presentations. Through her words and stories, students learned how bullying and harassment can easily turn into tragedy, but how simple acts of kindness and compassion can save lives and promote safe and productive learning environments for everyone.

    Rachel’s tragic story, along with how she led her life with hope, desire and purpose, brought both students and faculty members to tears. As Larry Scott talked about Rachel, he challenged students to show compassion, learn from their mistakes, and forgive themselves and others. He also challenged students to examine their own lives in light of personal challenges, and to dream big and start a chain reaction of kindness and compassion.